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November 13, 2008

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That's nice that they're personally informing da mare. Did he happen to mention any solutions?

Not exactly. More from da mare:

“Each [CEO] tell[s] me what they’re laying off and they’re going to double that next year. So, you’re talking about huge numbers of permanent layoffs…It’s going to have a huge effect upon all businesses relying off of one another. And for cities, counties and states, your revenue is going to keep coming down….Some of these local governments are going to be in jeopardy. They won’t have enough money to [meet] their payroll. It’s that serious....

"Everybody’s in the same boat in this economy. No one is outside the boat — except the federal government. There’s no layoffs in the federal government. They print money.”

What an inspiration he is for you. I wonder if he is laying the groundwork to cya (his) later on? Isn't he the one that you or Steve C. wrote about earlier - corruptness, etc.? Isn't he embedded in the system?

Susan, please do not get a conversation started on this blog between me and Mr. Crescenzo, about Obama.

The issue has almost torn us asunder, almost inspired us to buy muskets and commence firing at close range.

To answer your question, Obama is a complicated figure (but no more morally complicated than I am, I don't think), who I nevertheless do find great inspiration in and hold out great hope for.

But I didn't teach Scout those lyrics. She got them at school. A lot of people feel about Obama as I do.

No, silly - I was referring to your mayor.

Oh, Sweet Jesus, thank the Lord.

Yes, Daley is saying all this in part to get a budget cut passed. But my reaction is like Sun-Times columnist Mark Brown, who says he questions Daley's motives more than his facts.

And, it actually was "Mr. Crescenzo" (gaa, my fingers almost burst into flames as I typed that!) who wrote the (very detailed, I might add) post about just how corrupt Daley is, and that he will nevertheless be mayor until he dies or decides to walk away no matter how much damage he does.

BTW - Where can I get a job like that, please???

Oh, that's perfect.

Obama IS Rudolph . . . . both of them mythical figures with no experience and spotty pasts who are supposed to lead people through hard times with the power of their (rudolph: nose) (obama: personality).

It worked out okay for Rudolph!! Let's hope Obama as some of that same magic.

Steve C.

PS. David, nothing will ever tear us asunder. And they don't make muskets anymore. It would be Glocks, at ten paces.

But seriously . . . Does Daley have ANY IDEA how wrongheaded it is to make a statement like that? Might it not even be illegal?

I mean, there's not THAT many large companies in Chicago. Doesn't he know that the employees of those companies read the paper? And that those CEOs most likely have not told people about the layoffs yet?

I know he's covering his ass with the budget . . . but it's almost criminal, sparking what could be a city-wide panic during what it already scary times.

Steve C.

Yeah, you're right, Steve. It really was nasty of Daley to do that.

But illegal? It would be if internal communicators made the laws.

Well . . . isn't it sort of like insider trading if a CEO tells you something and you tell the world?

Whenever a company lays off employees, their stock usually goes up, doesn't it? The Street loves layoffs!!

So isn't that the kind of information that should not be shared in advance?

Steve C.

When you think about it, is it really likely that all these CEOs--Boeing, Sara Lee, Sears-- came parading to inform da mare they were thinking about trimming jobs?

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