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July 28, 2009

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Excellent, David. Simply excellent. Keep them coming.

This was SO cool, David!! I loved it!

Anyone who reads this and doesn't immediately call up their parent(s) to tell them how much they're loved and how much they mean to us after reading it? Well, I think they must be dead.

I'm happy to hear this reaction, guys.

It's a little uncomfortable publishing these personal entries; maybe that's why it's readable.

Kristen, I think I've let myself be fooled by friends who pose as having rejected or at least dismissed or at least escaped their parents' pull. That's a psychological survival technique; but I think that's all it is.

A wise friend once said that every choice we make from youth to death is either an acceptance of parental direction or a rejection--but she pointed out that you're dealing with your parents either way.

Well, I thought I could tell you that you failed to make me cry again, but no, the train story started me off. The shadow box is beautiful, she did a great job. What a great thing to have. This entry was really great-thanks so much for sharing!

Yes, you couldn't keep me from crying. It's not fair

David- If your dad is following you, arranging for amusing weather, etc., then surely he is deeply touched by your insight and proud of your prose. I look forward to the next and then another!

Louise, you know I was trying to make you cry forgive me.

Connie, I know he's paying attention, because he just stopped my watch again. I hesitate to call Tom, but I'm guessing his is running.

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Writing Boots readers will enjoy David Murray's memoir of his parents, who were real-life advertising Mad Men. Learn who these people really were, and how they raised us all.