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August 13, 2010

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I don't know, David. The more I read about the whole Steven Slater thing, the less enthralled I am with him. It turns out quite a few people feel he was the villain in this story, not a grouchy passenger.

And while I believe plenty of people have good reason to tell their employers what they can do with their jobs, I also believe we've become a nation of spoiled brats in many ways. I get frustrated with clients from time to time and I have enough distrust of corporate culture in general to remain self-employed as long as I can. But I also thank the Lord every day that I have clients to get frustrated with and that corporations need the services I provide.

It's fun to spend a few minutes living vicariously through this guy, but eventually it's time to get back to work.

"It's fun to spend a few minutes living vicariously through this guy, but eventually it's time to get back to work."

Well first of all, I think this is exactly what the nation is doing.

"But I also thank the Lord every day that I have clients to get frustrated with and that corporations need the services I provide."

Robert, this is an understandable emotion, but it's best relegated to beside prayers. If we all spend all day and night thanking God that we have jobs, however tedious and meaningless and stressful those jobs are, then we'll never agitate for anything better.

I agree that Steven Slater is no labor activist and no hero; he's one guy who went bonkers, and he will be forgotten, soon and completely.

It's just that dismissing him as "just a whiner" and a "nobody"--and the national reaction--is simply not something a person in employee communication ought to do.

I don't think we should ignore him. I just hesitate to elevate him to folk-hero status.

And I don't "spend all day and night thanking God" that I have a job. What I'm talking about is a spirit of gratitude -- something I believe is sorely missing in today's work world. My gratitude doesn't for a moment slow me down in pursuing new clients and striving to do better with each job I'm given. But look around you and you'll see a lot of whiners and complainers, which is where I think Lee's remarks are coming from.

I'm just super nervous that Cindy is now going to feel empowered to tell me to f&*k off, pull the cord on the figurative slide, and quite Crescenzo Commmunications.

Steve C.

And steal two beers.

I want to see his face on a US postage stamp. Or we could shove George Washington off the dollar bill and stick him on there. Or we could do both.

If she tries to take the beer, she doesn't make it on the slide. She knows that much, at least.

I can see both sides of this. Tom, as an engagement expert, should certainly be more in tune with what the workforce is feeling . . . and the workforce is frustrated and pissed off.

I just read an article in either the NYT or WSJ about how companies who are treating their employees like shit because they know the employees have no options (and there are a lot of them) better be ready, if and when the economy picks up, for a mass exodus of workers.

I think this Slater guy represents SOME of that inner rage.

I also think he himself is a little bitch, and I hope he doesn't become the representative of the "new workforce" or anything like that.

The new workforce needs some representation . . . just not that dude.

Steve C.

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