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July 30, 2014

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There's something of the Willy Loman in Mr. Dilenschneider's advice -- and look where that sort of philosophy got him. The fact is, we are in a state of crisis right now, where employers like Walmart pay less than a living wage, forcing employees to resort to welfare ... which is part of the company's business model, making it a particularly nefarious form of corporate welfare. How would this advice seem to those minimum wage workers? The issue is that the people Mr. Dilenschneider represents want (and get) all the goodies without assuming what Mr. D. refers to as "personal responsibility." And the fact that this mass of sodden, offensive cliches passes as wisdom shows how deep the crisis really is. Without a grasp of reality, there is no hope of change. There are no ideas here, only ideology.

You may give him too much credit, Hugh, when you imply that he actually believes his ideology. This is merely the yawning line he thinks his clients expect him to toe. And by "clients," I don't mean "labor unions, consumer groups and minorities."

As someone who spent nearly 13 years in the consulting biz, I'm still amazed at the prattle that passes for quality consulting, and even more amazed that big corporations continue to buy it. There is very little new under the sun, quite frankly, and it's rare that a true visionary comes along to reveal what is new. I wish I could have drawn the kind of salary Bob did for saying this stuff -- because I easily could have said it, but nobody would have paid for it.

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